Dare we say it…. The festive season is upon us, well almost! The annual flurry of Christmas TV adverts has begun and a multitude of Christmas window displays have been unveiled! As we’ve said time and time again, it’s more important than ever for retailers to focus on a thought-provoking and eye-opening in-store experiences to entice customers onto the high-street and into the shopping malls.

Whilst the rest of us were enjoying our summer holidays and British sunshine, retailers were hard at work brainstorming, designing and signing off their festive advertising campaigns. In fact, our very own CAD team are usually working on Christmas POS campaigns and window displays as early as February! We are sure your festive marketing campaign is either underway or about to launch but here’s some questions to perhaps ask yourself in the new year when you begin to plan next year’s in-store marketing concept…

Does it make a statement about who you are?

Christmas campaigns both in-store and online are a perfect opportunity to re-enforce what your brand stands for and what differentiates you from your competitors. Festive marketing campaigns tend to align creative story telling with brand values.

Take John Lewis, their “never knowingly undersold” policy demonstrates that although they aren’t purely about price cutting, they value both their reputation and customers enough to refund the difference in cost, should a customer find a product cheaper elsewhere.  Similarly, their highly anticipated Christmas adverts are never a blatant sales pitch, they tell a compelling and emotive story, which just like their brand policies, shout – we care!

John Lewis have also mastered the fine art of campaign integration from digital/television to in-store. Take last year’s Moz The Monster, who went onto play a huge role in their window displays and point of sale, fans could also purchase a range of Moz themed gifts from mugs and soft toys to pyjamas. Eleven of their stores even partnered with Buttercrumble to offer shoppers a take home bespoke illustrated portrait featuring them and Moz The Monster!

Although your Christmas advertising campaign and window display may help drive footfall in-store, you must ensure your in-store marketing is equally emotive to encourage conversions. It’s always important to ensure your printed POS is bright, bold and in-line with your other marketing efforts, however, we would also encourage in-store entertainment and festive events, as you may have gathered from our previous posts we are big ambassadors of experiential retail!

Window Displays

Has your window design been executed consistently across all stores?

The 3D mock-up was impressive and your flagship London store has received amazing feedback from customers and employees alike but what about your smaller stores? When you have a store portfolio of 50+ stores with varying window sizes it can be difficult to ensure they all carry a consistent theme and message whilst being installed to an equal standard.

Of course, it’s impossible to visit every store to ensure effective execution of the display but it is important to ensure your Retail POS provider has supplied thorough assembly instructions. Better still, you could request they carry out the installation of one of your flagship windows alongside your visual merchandising team, who can then use their new knowledge to assist in rolling the display out across the wider store portfolio.

Have you asked for feedback?                                                                                                     

As we mentioned earlier, many of our clients start to consider their in-store festive marketing campaigns as early as February, which means their previous year’s leanings are fresh. Ask your in-store management team to keep track of how your customers react to certain displays and props, what worked and what didn’t? What worked for one store may not have necessarily work another and whilst it’s a great opportunity for reflection and to decide where to re-invest your new budget, it’s also insightful to compare results from different locations which will allow for a more localised marketing strategy.